The Brave Little Fairy

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Carved into a grand old tree, a staircase curved around;

The steps led up to dizzy heights so far above the ground,

And all the grand ball-goers in sumptuous finery

Ascended with decorum; ’twas a wondrous thing to see!

One tiny fairy watching, breathed quite a heartfelt sigh

And could not help but whisper, “Oh, I do wish that were I!

To be invited to a ball, to honor Faeries’ Queen

Would be for me a dream come true, most splendid of all things!”

She looked down at her simple dress of maple leaves, well-worn

And at that moment felt herself the smallest bit forlorn,

For only those of social standing warranted invite

To the wondrous celebration taking place tonight.

She wondered if the Queen decreed that ever it should be

Only the special chosen should attend Her Majesty.

It seemed unfair to all the fae who loved the Lady well,

And she decided she would try to find a way to tell

Her Queen how all the fairy folk were feeling so neglected

And how each fairy’s happiness had sadly been affected.

She tiptoed up the staircase when all had ceased to climb

And slipped into the ballroom just in the nick of time,

To hide behind a curtain, free from censoring eyes,

And await her chance to slip out and her great Queen apprise.

She waited ’til the grandest had curtsied and had bowed

Before the throne, and told herself, “This is my moment, now!”

And flew and curtsied, ‘fore the Queen, though those around her stared

And gasped at such a lowly fairy daring to come there!

She poured her heart out to her Queen, though inside she was quaking;

She did not know what to expect, and her wee knees were shaking!

The Queen reached down and gently touched the fairy ‘neath her chin

And said, “Of course, you’re welcome here! Invite the whole wood in!”

The Queen then looked around the hall at all the snobbish guests

And told them that this little fairy seemed to love her best

For she knew how much her Queen did care for all the woodland fae,

And she was sorry that her court had behaved in such a way

As to deny the presence of her people at her ball,

And that was not the way she wished for things to be, at all!

Then she decreed that evermore an invitation go

To every member of the Fae so each dear heart would know

That they were loved and valued, and ever shall it be,

And joy reigned then in Fairyland, thanks to one wee brave fairy!

By Donna Ferguson Dudley

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